Embedded in memory

Off the beaten path — Part VI

On memory

From the earlier sections, I hope we now have a basic grasp of concepts like values, principles, enablement systems and the general map of culture. Of course, it’s quite a lot of ground to cover, so how much you understand probably depends upon how much you remember and when it comes to culture, nothing matters more than memory.

  • absent-mindedness — where event details are overlooked which can lead to change-blindness (failing to see differences unfolding over time) and shallow encoding (encoding only at a superficial level).
  • blocking — where information is encoded in memory but we can’t recall (i.e. someone’s name)
  • misattribution — where we do remember but what we remember is wrong or even not a memory of our own but manufactured.
  • suggestibility — the tendency to incorporate misleading information from external sources into personal recollections.
  • bias — distorting influences of our present knowledge, beliefs, feelings on new experiences, or our later memories of them
  • persistence — negative memories tend to persist a lot longer than positive ones.

Cultural cycles

At this point, we should highlight our first culture cycle (see figure 2 below). You can consider this a flywheel (in its positive sense) or a doom loop when things start going wrong.

Gameplay and culture

Gameplay is a negative term in the sense that we describe gameplay by those things which are not gameplay. In terms of patterns in mapping, then gameplay includes those patterns which are not :-

Gameplay, Doctrine and Landscape

Your choice of gameplay and the implementation of doctrine (universally useful principles such as “focus on user needs”) is influenced by the competitive landscape you are operating in. However, whilst doctrine is directly part of the flywheel (or doom loop if things are going wrong) in our culture map, the gameplay is more indirect in terms of influence. Landscape is even further removed from the loop. It should therefore be possible to provide generic advice on how to improve the culture of any organisation irrespective of the landscape it is operating within. I’ve marked this all up in figure 5 with the loop and doctrines impact within it (point 1), the impact of strategy and gameplay (point 2) and landscape (point 3).

Summary

There are a number of basic concepts I wished to get across in the section. These include :-

  • Your choices and actions, from your use of universally useful principles to gameplay, will affect that memory.
  • Within culture there are loops, some of which are positive (flywheel) and some of which can be negative (doom loop).
  • Not all gameplay is equal, some is more “evil” than others depending upon what your collective values.
  • Gameplay can impact culture and also can be constrained by it since it’s part of the same thing.

Off the beaten track

Part I — What culture is right for you?
Part II — Exploring culture
Part III — Exploring Brexit
Part IV — From Values to Rituals
Part V — Exploring Value
Part VI — Embedded in memory
Part VII — Me vs We

The book so far

Chapter 1 — On being lost
Chapter 2 — Finding a path
Chapter 3 — Exploring the map
Chapter 4 — Doctrine
Chapter 5 — The play and a decision to act
Chapter 6 — Getting started yourself
Chapter 7 — Finding a new purpose
Chapter 8 — Keeping the wolves at bay
Chapter 9 — Charting the future
Chapter 10 — I wasn’t expecting that!
Chapter 11 — A smorgasbord of the slightly useful
Chapter 12 — The scenario
Chapter 13 — Something wicked this way comes
Chapter 14 — To thine own self be true
Chapter 15 — On the practice of scenario planning
Chapter 16 — Super Looper
Chapter 17 — To infinity and beyond
Chapter 18 — Better for Less
Chapter 19 — On Playing Chess

I like ducks, they're fowl but not through choice. RT is not an endorsement but a sign that I find a particular subject worthy of challenge and discussion.